Saturday, April 15, 2006

Harvard loses Game One, 3-1

...and is losing Game Two, 5-4 in the sixth. The Sporting News CT link below is working.

5 comments:

Pablo said...

Yale 7 Harvard 6 now in the top of the 8th thanks to some aggressive baserunning and timely 2-out hitting. Mackey strikes out and Brunnig pops up to begin the inning, then Salsgiver gets on, steals second, throw misplayed by Yale 2B, Salsgiver to 3rd; Vance gets on with an RBI single, then steals second (league-leading 16th of the year); Steffan Wilson hits a rocket into the corner, Vance scores easily. Klim then draws a walk in a tough at-bat. Morgan Brown then pinch-hits for Matt Rogers, and Yale changes the pitcher...stay tuned.

pablo said...

Closer Brett Rosenthal comes in (with an excellent resume on the season thus far, by the way), and Morgan Brown promptly scores Wilson on the first pitch of the game. BUT, Klim gets gunned down at the plate as Harvard tries to stretch it into a 2-RBI hit. 7-7 now, heading into the bottom of the 8th. Wow.

pablo said...

Twin-homicide saves Brunnig with a runner on third. Into the ninth, where it's Taylor Meehan on first with one out thanks to a fielder's choice. Brett Rosenthal has now been replaced by the lefty Adam Barrick (0.00 ERA, 5 H allowed on the year)...alright, no more updates until the game goes final.

pablo said...

Uh...that might be the weirdest ending to a game I ever heard. Harvard wins, 8-7, after pushing one across against Barrick in the top of the ninth. So from what I gather, it was a double play on some sortof variation on the infield fly rule in which the ball drifted from foul into fair territory (?!), the ball was not caught by Wilson at third, and no one from Yale advanced. This is where The Crimson's reporters on the scene will come up huge, and I, sitting on my bed in New York, stop posting. But yeah. Castellanos came in to relieve Brunning and close it out by the way, with the bags full and one out in the bottom of the ninth.

Brian said...

Shouldn't the infield fly have called in case the ball was fair rather than not called at all because it looked foul? Not complaining, though.